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North Carolina Air National Guard Supports "I am Air Force Energy"

Proper lighting is a key factor for the 145th Maintenance Squadron (MXS), as airmen work on two C-130 Hercules aircraft at the North Carolina Air National Guard base, Charlotte Douglas Intl. Airport, Sept. 19, 2014. 145th Civil Engineer Squadron (CES) maintains the buildings, structures and utilities on the base but also must comply with the Department of Defense Energy Action Plan. To sustain both missions, 145th CES replaced 11 existing inefficient 1000-watt lights with 400 watt induction lamps. This initiative contributed to an annual savings of more than $1,600.00 for the 145th Airlift Wing. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Patricia F. Moran, 145th Public Affairs/Released)

Proper lighting is a key factor for the 145th Maintenance Squadron (MXS), as airmen work on two C-130 Hercules aircraft at the North Carolina Air National Guard base, Charlotte Douglas Intl. Airport, Sept. 19, 2014. 145th Civil Engineer Squadron (CES) maintains the buildings, structures and utilities on the base but also must comply with the Department of Defense Energy Action Plan. To sustain both missions, 145th CES replaced 11 existing inefficient 1000-watt lights with 400 watt induction lamps. This initiative contributed to an annual savings of more than $1,600.00 for the 145th Airlift Wing. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Patricia F. Moran, 145th Public Affairs/Released)

Solar powered lighting not only illuminates runners on the track at the North Carolina Air National Guard base, Charlotte Douglas Intl. Airport, but also helps conserve energy cost. Conserving energy is a primary function for the airmen of the 145th Civil Engineer Squadron (CES). Contractors and Airmen installed solar lighting in several areas on the base. Solar panels are tilted at certain angle to get maximum solar exposure and energy output in the late afternoon, just at the time when the base is experiencing peak demand due to higher temperatures and cooling needs. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Patricia F. Moran, 145th Public Affairs/Released)

Solar powered lighting not only illuminates runners on the track at the North Carolina Air National Guard base, Charlotte Douglas Intl. Airport, but also helps conserve energy cost. Conserving energy is a primary function for the airmen of the 145th Civil Engineer Squadron (CES). Contractors and Airmen installed solar lighting in several areas on the base. Solar panels are tilted at certain angle to get maximum solar exposure and energy output in the late afternoon, just at the time when the base is experiencing peak demand due to higher temperatures and cooling needs. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Patricia F. Moran, 145th Public Affairs/Released)

Members of the North Carolina Air National Guard, located at the Charlotte Douglas Intl. Airport, take conserving energy very seriously.  The 145th Civil Engineer Squadron is taking steps to promote awareness of the little things everyone can do on a daily basis to be more energy efficient and be more aware of energy and water conservation. Shutting off lights is a great start.  Replacing older lights with compact fluorescent lights (CFLs) or light-emitting diodes (LEDs) use three-quarters of the electricity and last 10 times longer. Occupancy sensors can save between 15 and 30 percent on lighting costs. Everyone plays a key role in saving energy. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Patricia F. Moran, 145th Public Affairs/Released)

Members of the North Carolina Air National Guard, located at the Charlotte Douglas Intl. Airport, take conserving energy very seriously. The 145th Civil Engineer Squadron is taking steps to promote awareness of the little things everyone can do on a daily basis to be more energy efficient and be more aware of energy and water conservation. Shutting off lights is a great start. Replacing older lights with compact fluorescent lights (CFLs) or light-emitting diodes (LEDs) use three-quarters of the electricity and last 10 times longer. Occupancy sensors can save between 15 and 30 percent on lighting costs. Everyone plays a key role in saving energy. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Patricia F. Moran, 145th Public Affairs/Released)

Members of the North Carolina Air National Guard, Charlotte Douglas Intl. Airport, take conserving energy very seriously.  The 145th Civil Engineer Squadron is taking steps to promote awareness of the little things everyone can do on a daily basis to be more energy efficient and be more aware of energy and water conservation. Make sure faucets are completely shut off. Repair leaking pipes, fixtures, and seals. Small leaks add up to many gallons of water and dollars wasted each month. Everyone plays a key role in saving energy. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Patricia F. Moran, 145th Public Affairs/Released)

Members of the North Carolina Air National Guard, Charlotte Douglas Intl. Airport, take conserving energy very seriously. The 145th Civil Engineer Squadron is taking steps to promote awareness of the little things everyone can do on a daily basis to be more energy efficient and be more aware of energy and water conservation. Make sure faucets are completely shut off. Repair leaking pipes, fixtures, and seals. Small leaks add up to many gallons of water and dollars wasted each month. Everyone plays a key role in saving energy. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Patricia F. Moran, 145th Public Affairs/Released)

CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- October is Energy Action Month throughout the federal government and in the Air Force. "I am Air Force Energy" is a campaign dedicated to educating Airmen on ways they can maximize their energy efficiency and mission effectiveness.

Throughout October, members of the 145th Civil Engineer Squadron (CES) are sharing innovative ways in which Airmen and their families can make more energy-aware choices. These include turning off lights, limiting the time vehicles idle, shutting down unnecessary appliances and other equipment and observing energy efficient behavior on the job. Implementing these sorts of practices can have a significant impact on reducing energy demands.

"My concept of Energy Conservation is simple, treat your workplace as you would your own home." said Master Sgt. George "Jason" Huffstetler, Facility Manager, 145th CES. "Our average electric bill at the 145th is $28,000 per month. If you were paying that bill would your mindset change?"

At the North Carolina Air National Guard (NCANG) base, 145th CES leads by example.
Several old HVAC condensing/chilling units broke and were replaced with more efficient units.

Infrared heaters were installed throughout NCANG's Geographical Separated Unit (GSU) in Stanly County, N.C. "Even with the polar vortex we experienced in January, we reduced the propane use in Stanly County by 30 percent." said Lt. Col. Milton Addison, commander, 145th CES.

In August of this year CE replaced the overhead doors in one of the maintenance buildings. The immediate impact was that their thermostats had to be raised 2 degrees because the new doors reduced the air infiltration so much that the customer was cold, lowering the electric bill by reducing the need for air-conditioning.

Individual solar lights were installed, illuminating the track around the fitness center. Energy conserving fixtures are used on all new construction and repair projects. Many rooms now have occupancy sensors that automatically turn lights on and off.

Over the past few years, 145th CES airmen and contractors have also been aggressive in upgrading and repairing the water distribution system, eliminating leaks and improving performance. All renovations and construction, both at the 145th AW in Charlotte, N.C. and at the NCANG's GSU in Stanly County, N.C., use low-flow fixtures. Even plants, shrubs and trees have been replaced with more hearty varieties to help eliminate ground watering.

"Since the Air Force is the largest consumer of energy among all federal agencies, it is imperative we do our part." Lt. Col. Addison added, "We need to conserve energy and look into ways to start using more renewable energy.  For the most part, utility bills are like taxes it's always going up, so everything we do to conserve energy will help the NCANG save money for its most valuable asset - Airmen!"